How to make your Fussy Eater eat Healthy 2 to 10 Years

Live Chat - How to make your Fussy Eater eat Healthy (2 to 10 Years)

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Mr Dinesh Banur

How to make your Fussy Eater eat Healthy (2 to 10 Years)

Mr. Dinesh Banur, Consultant Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Columbia Asia, Bangalore


Aug 22, 2015 | 12 : 30 PM to 1 : 15 PM

Getting a child to eat healthy can be tricky sometimes. You want your child to eat well and you want the meals to be nutritious too. From wrangling a fussy eater to offering key nutrients, get all the answers you have been looking for.

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My kids don't want to eat fruits?how can I feed them?

My kids don't want to eat fruits?how can I feed them?

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Parents are after all their children’s role models, children replicate what they see. Buy fruits every day and eat it in front of them. Offer them a piece of fruit when you are eating and if they accept it praise them. When you take them for shopping, encourage them to participate in buying their favourite fruits and vegetables. Replace snack jars and fridge desserts with fruits instead of chocolates, pastries and sweets. 2015-08-22 12:31:17
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My 5 year old hates veggies. He doesn't like even the sight of any green, orange yellows in his plat....

My 5 year old hates veggies. He doesn't like even the sight of any green, orange yellows in his plate. All he prefers is curd rice and egg. He eats almost 3 eggs a day. Is that fine? How do I make him like veggies?

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
• Sit together as a family and eat at meal time. Make sure all of you eat vegetables in front of him. • Make the meal experience complete by allowing your child sit on the kitchen slab while you are cooking. Give him small pieces of salads (cut pieces of cucumber, carrot) and eat along with him. Let him help you with small tasks in the kitchen while cooking. Also, take him to the supermarket and let him choose his favourite vegetables. At home, cook dishes out of his vegetable selections and let him create happy experiences about vegetables. • Make some gestures like “yummy” when you eat vegetables. It creates interest. Don’t offer in the first instinct when he asks, let him ask again. • Decorate cut salads in an interesting fashion (like humpty dumpty, fish, moon etc.), he will love to pick and eat. If he likes dips, use it to make him eat his vegetables. Let him first try the concept of eating one vegetable and realize that it’s not such a bad experience. Subsequently encourage other vegetables. • Unlike a cut piece of vegetable, it is good to grate vegetables so that even some clever children cannot pick out the vegetables. • Always think of clever ways of adding vegetables into his favourite dish. Whether it is adding vegetables to his favorite food – like grating carrots in curd rice or stuffing vegetables into his paranthas; or choosing a vegetable topping instead of a chees topping while ordering for pizzas. 2015-08-22 12:31:52
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How important is non veg for a toddler? How easily digestible is it and what could be veg substitute....

How important is non veg for a toddler? How easily digestible is it and what could be veg substitute for lean protein

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
• If you are a non vegetarian, it’s a good idea to introduce meat into your child’s diet as it is a source of vitamin B12 and iron. Often vegetarians suffer from a vitamin B12 deficiency. Try not to give them too much of fat though. Fish is good for the brain. It’s a myth that children cannot digest meat. Take precaution with bone pieces especially with younger children. • Alternative sources of proteins for vegetarians are soya protein and green leafy vegetables. One can also give children health food supplements like Horlicks, Bournvita and HiOwna Kidz. But this can NOT be a meal replacement. 2015-08-22 12:32:57
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My daughter will do all nonsense at the meal time . she is 5.6 years old some how I have managed her....

My daughter will do all nonsense at the meal time . she is 5.6 years old some how I have managed her to drink milk of her own from last some days. Now main course becomes troublesome. She doesn't want any vegetable . I mash omelette and put that in her paratha. Feeding her is a pain. Kindly help

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Fussy feeding, fooling around meal time is a very common problem in children. Parents must not try to force feed but rather wait for the child’s appetite to resurface. You could consider the following tips. • It is natural that what your child likes to eat today may not be what they prefer next week, just adding misery to parental worries. • It is also natural for toddlers to have food fads - he may prefer to eat pastry with every meal, just to be replaced by chocolate or gulab jamun next week. • With time, children learn that only at mealtime they get their parent’s undivided attention or alternatively this si the only time they can display their rebellious attitude. • A child learns early that eating, or not eating, can be a great way to please or displease parents. It’s a habit that forms early and is difficult to change later. So think and act early. • If you say “NO” to a child, or prescribe an order – vegetables first and dessert later, they are very likely to the exact opposite of what you say. So always remember to reinforce good choices with praise. It is important to encourage or reward a child to create good eating habits. For example - When they eat their vegetables give them praise. When they sit still on a chair at meal time, appreciate them by saying “good girl/boy you are already sitting and ready for your meal!” Like every other action, eating too is a learning experience. Your child needs to learn to pay attention to body signals when she is hungry, and understand her body’s way of telling her when she has had enough. Children need that confidence that food will be available when hungry and they should not be force fed when not hungry. Let them decide how much to eat. These are valuable lessons you will teach your child for their lifetime! • DO NOT FORCE FEED. By doing so, you can turn a simple dislike to a particular food to permanent hatred. They may later refuse other food as they link eating to be an unpleasant experience. The more you try to overpower them, the more miserably you will fail. • Try to make meal time a pleasant experience. Try to sit together as a family during meal time. It will encourage your child to eat and also let her pick from your plate. Avoid distractions like television or music. • Offer small portions of food to your child in a bite-sized colourful bowl or plate (eg. Mickey Mouse/ Donald Duck/ Barbie girl). This will ensure that she is not scared to see large quantities which will automatically reduce her appetite. Once she completes her portion, don't jump and serve but wait and let her ask for food. Give her a gentle praises for good choices. By doing this, you are encouraging to develop eagerness to food. • The child does not grow at the same pace at all times. The child growth chart is a very good indicator of their health rather than just the number of on the weighing machine by itself. • If the child refuses to eat what she used to eat before, don't fight or argue, just offer something different. Bring a variety of healthy choices into the diet. • If your child is fooling around at play time, perhaps she is not hungry. A child that’s hungry will not play. So doesn't pressurize her to eat. Leave her alone. If they ask for something, give them another chance, but if she is still fooling around then don’t offer until the next meal. • Some children like to eat one thing all the time, don't worry, let your child get used to habit of eating and create good memories from the eating experience. Then you could slowly introduce another food at a different time. • Try not to offer sugary things like chocolates, juices with added sugar, especially before the meal time as it takes away the appetite. • Regularize times for meals and snacks. For example three meals and two snacks in between. Don't nag your child to eat at meal time. Set some time limits (usually 30 minutes is enough) for yourself, if she is refusing to eat or eats small quantities, then take away her plate or bowl without any complaints or showing any disappointment. Don’t try to make her eat an hour later. Offer next only at snack time. She will certainly make up for the extra calories. This whole exercise should be carried out with the right sprit and with an intention to help your child. It should not come across to your child as a threatening behaviour, eg. slamming the plate if he does not eat, raising voice, and showing disappointment. By doing this you will simply make them lose their appetite. • It is reasonable to set some discipline around meal time and not to allow your child to make unpleasant comments about food. It is important that parents take control of meal time rather than allowing your child to take control. Both parents and family members need to be in agreement so that there are no wrong or confusing messages sent to child when it comes to feeding eg. A mother follows a particular schedule and father does something different. • It is reasonable to consider your child’s preferences for the kind of food prepared at home. But it is a bad idea to only prioritize her preferences. • If you don't like some food, don't make a comment about it in front of your child eg. “I can't stand spinach”, and then don't expect your child not to follow that behaviour! • Don't bribe your child to take a few mouthfuls, eg. Telling stories or showing something to persuade him to eat, it will not work well in long term. It will simply dampen their appetite in the long run. • Don't force your child to eat more immediately after recovering from an illness until his appetite has returned. • Don't feel pressurized or guilty about thinking what others have to feel about your child's eating habits. Every family has someone with eating problems. Don't compare someone else’s eating habits with your child. • Encourage your child slowly to eat on his own (start moving away from his vicinity using an excuse for few minutes at a time to see what they do with food). Start off slowly to encourage them to finish one meal on their own and then gradually build up. If they learn to eat one meal on their own there should be no reason why they cannot eat other meals. • Accept your child’s food choices for a while. If they like only one food and refuses to touch another they may need multivitamin supplements during that period. You can then gradually introduce a balanced diet. • If your child is throwing food around, you need to tell them firmly and calmly that food is for eating and not throwing. Give them some something like a ball or a toy to throw in the meanwhile. • Children have an amazing capacity to learn. If you want your child to learn good table manners, then you should have one. After all, you are their role models and they copy you. • If they have eaten half of the meal, and left the rest, don't pick up the plate and feed the other half. You are going to undo his ability to listen to his body. Just take the plate away and next time serve smaller amounts. When his hunger improves he will polish off the plate. • If your child is gagging with solids it is important that you teach them to eat on their own. This helps them to get over the suspicion of food. After a period you can slowly increase the consistency of their food. • With practice you should be able to stop thinking too much about your child’s food habits. • When the child feels no pressure, they will pay attention to their own appetite. • Feeling frustrated or angry will only stop you from doing the right thing for your child. • When you understand and introduce these small changes, your child’s behaviour will undergo a change as they have observed you change. Although be warned, the behaviour is prone to get worse before it gets better. • Its hard work, and takes a lot of patience and perseverance but at the end of the day it works. We all love our children and want them to learn and have the best. • If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor. This expert assessment can help you evaluate if your child has underlying medical problems. 2015-08-22 12:33:35
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I have twin 4-year old boys. While one of them enjoys food and is generally not fussy the other does....

I have twin 4-year old boys. While one of them enjoys food and is generally not fussy the other does not enjoy eating much. He has reflux sometimes, tends not to chew food he doesn't like and his appetite for cereals and carbs tends to be between 3-5 spoons. He enjoys certain fruits and raw vegetables. Using rewards like points/stars has worked only with limited success. He goes without food for over 7-8 hours at a stretch (eats breakfast at 8 in the morning and doesn't eat during short break or lunch school, the next meal is at 4 pm at home). Even this meal he hardly ever eats 4-5 spoons on his own. Being a twin sibling, at 4 years he is 5 kgs below and 5-6 cms below his brother. However, he still is within the 10 - 25 percentile range for his age range.

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Don’t compare one child with the other. Each child is an individual with their own potential. What your child eats during the course of the week is more important than what he eats over a day. If the weight is tracking optimally on the growth chart over a period of time, then you have no cause to worry. Please try reading the tips I have shared in my previous answers to help you with small changes that will make big differences. If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor, who can evaluate to see if your child has underlying medical problems related to symptoms. 2015-08-22 12:34:49
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My son is 4 yrs and 7 months old.He is very choosy with food.Most of the time during breakfast,lunch....

My son is 4 yrs and 7 months old.He is very choosy with food.Most of the time during breakfast,lunch and dinner time we have to force him to have food.But he likes fruit and chicken and I have given a multivitamin which have lycopene.His weight and height is less according to his age .His weight is only 15.8 kg and 107 cm.We are really worried about not eating properly .

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
If the weight is tracking optimally on the growth chart over a period of time, then you have no cause to worry. Please try reading the tips I have shared in my previous answers to help you with small changes that will make big differences. If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor, who can evaluate to see if your child has underlying medical problems related to symptoms. The trajectory of growth on the growth chart is more important than a single measurement of weight at any given point of time. Each child has different parameters on a growth chart and it is not advisable to compare the growth chart of one child with another. The growth chart of the child is the most important measure of the health of your child. 2015-08-22 12:36:14
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My son is 6 years old and weighs 20kgs....he has this constant weight since the past three years........

My son is 6 years old and weighs 20kgs....he has this constant weight since the past three years....he is a hyperactive child....eats everything...but is not gaining weight.plz advice

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
If the weight is tracking optimally on the growth chart over a period of time, then you have no cause to worry. Please try reading the tips I have shared in my previous answers to help you with small changes that will make big differences. If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor, who can evaluate to see if your child has underlying medical problems related to symptoms. The trajectory of growth on the growth chart is more important than a single measurement of weight at any given point of time. Each child has different parameters on a growth chart and it is not advisable to compare the growth chart of one child with another. The growth chart is the most important measure of the health of your child. Ensure that your child is eating a nutritionally wholesome diet – fruits, vegetables, if you are non-vegetarian – eggs, meat, not too much fat. If you are vegetarian ensure you have healthy protein supplements. Growth naturally slows down after 2 years until puberty for all children. Based on their needs, children tend to eat according to their requirements. Typically, children tend to gain around 2-3 kgs and 5-6 cms every year during this period. If the child’s growth pattern shows this, it’s not a cause to worry. 2015-08-22 12:37:07
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My son is completed his 7 yrs on 28th sep.But till today he never ask for food ,that he is hungry.ev....

My son is completed his 7 yrs on 28th sep.But till today he never ask for food ,that he is hungry.every time I offer food to him.Then only he will say yes give .and don't want to eat himself.

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Like every other action, eating too is a learning experience. Your child needs to learn to pay attention to body signals when she is hungry, and understand her body’s way of telling her when she has had enough. Children need that confidence that food will be available when hungry and they should not be force fed when not hungry. Let them decide how much to eat. These are valuable lessons you will teach your child for their lifetime! • DO NOT FORCE FEED. By doing so, you can turn a simple dislike to a particular food to permanent hatred. They may later refuse other food as they link eating to be an unpleasant experience. The more you try to overpower them, the more miserably you will fail. • Try to make meal time a pleasant experience. Try to sit together as a family during meal time. It will encourage your child to eat and also let her pick from your plate. Avoid distractions like television or music. • Offer small portions of food to your child in a bite-sized colourful bowl or plate (eg. Mickey Mouse/ Donald Duck/ Barbie girl). This will ensure that she is not scared to see large quantities which will automatically reduce her appetite. Once she completes her portion, don't jump and serve but wait and let her ask for food. Give her a gentle praises for good choices. By doing this, you are encouraging to develop eagerness to food. • The child does not grow at the same pace at all times. The child growth chart is a very good indicator of their health rather than just the number of on the weighing machine by itself. • If the child refuses to eat what she used to eat before, don't fight or argue, just offer something different. Bring a variety of healthy choices into the diet. • If your child is fooling around at play time, perhaps she is not hungry. A child that’s hungry will not play. So doesn't pressurize her to eat. Leave her alone. If they ask for something, give them another chance, but if she is still fooling around then don’t offer until the next meal. • Some children like to eat one thing all the time, don't worry, let your child get used to habit of eating and create good memories from the eating experience. Then you could slowly introduce another food at a different time. • Try not to offer sugary things like chocolates, juices with added sugar, especially before the meal time as it takes away the appetite. • Regularize times for meals and snacks. For example three meals and two snacks in between. Don't nag your child to eat at meal time. Set some time limits (usually 30 minutes is enough) for yourself, if she is refusing to eat or eats small quantities, then take away her plate or bowl without any complaints or showing any disappointment. Don’t try to make her eat an hour later. Offer next only at snack time. She will certainly make up for the extra calories. This whole exercise should be carried out with the right sprit and with an intention to help your child. It should not come across to your child as a threatening behaviour, eg. slamming the plate if he does not eat, raising voice, and showing disappointment. By doing this you will simply make them lose their appetite. • It is reasonable to set some discipline around meal time and not to allow your child to make unpleasant comments about food. It is important that parents take control of meal time rather than allowing your child to take control. Both parents and family members need to be in agreement so that there are no wrong or confusing messages sent to child when it comes to feeding eg. A mother follows a particular schedule and father does something different. • It is reasonable to consider your child’s preferences for the kind of food prepared at home. But it is a bad idea to only prioritize her preferences. • If you don't like some food, don't make a comment about it in front of your child eg. “I can't stand spinach”, and then don't expect your child not to follow that behaviour! • Don't bribe your child to take a few mouthfuls, eg. Telling stories or showing something to persuade him to eat, it will not work well in long term. It will simply dampen their appetite in the long run. • Don't force your child to eat more immediately after recovering from an illness until his appetite has returned. • Don't feel pressurized or guilty about thinking what others have to feel about your child's eating habits. Every family has someone with eating problems. Don't compare someone else’s eating habits with your child. • Encourage your child slowly to eat on his own (start moving away from his vicinity using an excuse for few minutes at a time to see what they do with food). Start off slowly to encourage them to finish one meal on their own and then gradually build up. If they learn to eat one meal on their own there should be no reason why they cannot eat other meals. • Accept your child’s food choices for a while. If they like only one food and refuses to touch another they may need multivitamin supplements during that period. You can then gradually introduce a balanced diet. • If your child is throwing food around, you need to tell them firmly and calmly that food is for eating and not throwing. Give them some something like a ball or a toy to throw in the meanwhile. • Children have an amazing capacity to learn. If you want your child to learn good table manners, then you should have one. After all, you are their role models and they copy you. • If they have eaten half of the meal, and left the rest, don't pick up the plate and feed the other half. You are going to undo his ability to listen to his body. Just take the plate away and next time serve smaller amounts. When his hunger improves he will polish off the plate. • If your child is gagging with solids it is important that you teach them to eat on their own. This helps them to get over the suspicion of food. After a period you can slowly increase the consistency of their food. • With practice you should be able to stop thinking too much about your child’s food habits. • When the child feels no pressure, they will pay attention to their own appetite. • Feeling frustrated or angry will only stop you from doing the right thing for your child. • When you understand and introduce these small changes, your child’s behaviour will undergo a change as they have observed you change. Although be warned, the behaviour is prone to get worse before it gets better. • Its hard work, and takes a lot of patience and perseverance but at the end of the day it works. We all love our children and want them to learn and have the best. • If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor. This expert assessment can help you evaluate if your child has underlying medical problems. 2015-08-22 12:38:11
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Set a meal time and place. Avoid sweets, chocolates or pastries between meal times. More importantly never use any of these as bribe. These will work against your favour in the long term. Work strategies using the tips provided for the hunger to resurface. Make sure he is tracking weight as per his age on the growth chart. As long as his weight is tracking well on the growth chart and he is taking a nutritious diet, it is not a matter of concern. 2015-08-22 12:39:46
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My daughter is 10 and only gaining height,hardly any weight.she looks like a bamboo stick.she eats b....

My daughter is 10 and only gaining height,hardly any weight.she looks like a bamboo stick.she eats but not appropriately and still fusses on eating.takes an hour per meal.how can I increase her weight as she looks extremely undernourished.also if you could suggest some tonics that may help in appetite increase.or some helpful vitamins and minerals or protein tonics.thank you.

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
You should try and look at your child’s growth chart. How she looks on the growth chart is more important than how she looks in person. Monitor the growth chart closely to see where she is and how she is progressing. Ensure whatever she eats is nutritious (ie. green leafy vegetables, fruits, meat (if you eat non veg), and avoid junk food and sweets. There is no medication in the world to increase appetite. Consult with your doctor to ensure that there are not any any underlying problems for her undernourishment. If these parameters have been verified and any medical issues have been ruled you may give her multivitamin supplements for a few months post consultation with your pediatrician. 2015-08-22 12:46:23
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1. My elder daughter is 3.11 yrs old and she is underweight. her weight is 14.2 kg. Most of the time....

1. My elder daughter is 3.11 yrs old and she is underweight. her weight is 14.2 kg. Most of the times she eats plain chapati or plain rice. Don't want to try much of the varieties and she never finish her tiffin in her school even though she went empty stomach to school. She gets viral and urine infections very frequent and quickly. She has also developed remarkable dark circles. Most of the times she is with maid and dont listen to her. 2. My younger daughter is 1.6 yrs old. And she is also underweight. Her weight is 7.5 kg only. She eats everything and not fussy eater, but she don't gain weight. Her pediatrician says she will pick up gradually. But I dont think so. Please help

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
About your elder daughter: Her diet from what you mention seems to be very under nutritious. You need to try and include variety into her diet like green leafy vegetables, fruits, meat (if you eat non veg) and egg. About the infections, it is natural for a child to have recurrent viral infections. Having a nutritious diet can help build immunity against these viral infections. (Especially fruits which are rich in Vitamin C) Like every other action, eating too is a learning experience. Your child needs to learn to pay attention to body signals when she is hungry, and understand her body’s way of telling her when she has had enough. Children need that confidence that food will be available when hungry and they should not be force fed when not hungry. Let them decide how much to eat. These are valuable lessons you will teach your child for their lifetime! • DO NOT FORCE FEED. By doing so, you can turn a simple dislike to a particular food to permanent hatred. They may later refuse other food as they link eating to be an unpleasant experience. The more you try to overpower them, the more miserably you will fail. • Try to make meal time a pleasant experience. Try to sit together as a family during meal time. It will encourage your child to eat and also let her pick from your plate. Avoid distractions like television or music. • Offer small portions of food to your child in a bite-sized colourful bowl or plate (eg. Mickey Mouse/ Donald Duck/ Barbie girl). This will ensure that she is not scared to see large quantities which will automatically reduce her appetite. Once she completes her portion, don't jump and serve but wait and let her ask for food. Give her a gentle praises for good choices. By doing this, you are encouraging to develop eagerness to food. • The child does not grow at the same pace at all times. The child growth chart is a very good indicator of their health rather than just the number of on the weighing machine by itself. • If the child refuses to eat what she used to eat before, don't fight or argue, just offer something different. Bring a variety of healthy choices into the diet. • If your child is fooling around at play time, perhaps she is not hungry. A child that’s hungry will not play. So doesn't pressurize her to eat. Leave her alone. If they ask for something, give them another chance, but if she is still fooling around then don’t offer until the next meal. • Some children like to eat one thing all the time, don't worry, let your child get used to habit of eating and create good memories from the eating experience. Then you could slowly introduce another food at a different time. • Try not to offer sugary things like chocolates, juices with added sugar, especially before the meal time as it takes away the appetite. • Regularize times for meals and snacks. For example three meals and two snacks in between. Don't nag your child to eat at meal time. Set some time limits (usually 30 minutes is enough) for yourself, if she is refusing to eat or eats small quantities, then take away her plate or bowl without any complaints or showing any disappointment. Don’t try to make her eat an hour later. Offer next only at snack time. She will certainly make up for the extra calories. This whole exercise should be carried out with the right sprit and with an intention to help your child. It should not come across to your child as a threatening behaviour, eg. slamming the plate if he does not eat, raising voice, and showing disappointment. By doing this you will simply make them lose their appetite. • It is reasonable to set some discipline around meal time and not to allow your child to make unpleasant comments about food. It is important that parents take control of meal time rather than allowing your child to take control. Both parents and family members need to be in agreement so that there are no wrong or confusing messages sent to child when it comes to feeding eg. A mother follows a particular schedule and father does something different. • It is reasonable to consider your child’s preferences for the kind of food prepared at home. But it is a bad idea to only prioritize her preferences. • If you don't like some food, don't make a comment about it in front of your child eg. “I can't stand spinach”, and then don't expect your child not to follow that behaviour! • Don't bribe your child to take a few mouthfuls, eg. Telling stories or showing something to persuade him to eat, it will not work well in long term. It will simply dampen their appetite in the long run. • Don't force your child to eat more immediately after recovering from an illness until his appetite has returned. • Don't feel pressurized or guilty about thinking what others have to feel about your child's eating habits. Every family has someone with eating problems. Don't compare someone else’s eating habits with your child. • Encourage your child slowly to eat on his own (start moving away from his vicinity using an excuse for few minutes at a time to see what they do with food). Start off slowly to encourage them to finish one meal on their own and then gradually build up. If they learn to eat one meal on their own there should be no reason why they cannot eat other meals. • Accept your child’s food choices for a while. If they like only one food and refuses to touch another they may need multivitamin supplements during that period. You can then gradually introduce a balanced diet. • If your child is throwing food around, you need to tell them firmly and calmly that food is for eating and not throwing. Give them some something like a ball or a toy to throw in the meanwhile. • Children have an amazing capacity to learn. If you want your child to learn good table manners, then you should have one. After all, you are their role models and they copy you. • If they have eaten half of the meal, and left the rest, don't pick up the plate and feed the other half. You are going to undo his ability to listen to his body. Just take the plate away and next time serve smaller amounts. When his hunger improves he will polish off the plate. • If your child is gagging with solids it is important that you teach them to eat on their own. This helps them to get over the suspicion of food. After a period you can slowly increase the consistency of their food. • With practice you should be able to stop thinking too much about your child’s food habits. • When the child feels no pressure, they will pay attention to their own appetite. • Feeling frustrated or angry will only stop you from doing the right thing for your child. • When you understand and introduce these small changes, your child’s behaviour will undergo a change as they have observed you change. Although be warned, the behaviour is prone to get worse before it gets better. • Its hard work, and takes a lot of patience and perseverance but at the end of the day it works. We all love our children and want them to learn and have the best. • If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor. This expert assessment can help you evaluate if your child has underlying medical problems. I am sure you noticed that I have advised about the meal discipline. You mentioned that she spends a major portion of her time with the maid. Ensure that the maid and all other people whom she spends time with are in sync with the meal discipline and plans you create for her health and well-being. I am sure you will notice a remarkable change if you can attempt to incorporate some of these changes. 2015-08-22 12:55:15
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
I understand that your younger daughter is not a fussy eater but she still does not put on weight. She may not be a fussy eater but it’s important for you to ensure that she gets a balanced calorie rich diet – cheese slices, paneer cubes, full fat milk, and protein supplements like – Pure MCT powder, Neogain milk (chicken based milk), or if you are vegetarian then HiOwna Kidz. Even after having a calorie rich diet if she has not gained weight then it would be good for you to consult with your pediatrician to exclude any medical reasons for the weight gain issues. 2015-08-22 13:00:46
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
I do want to say this again. The growth chart is the most important parameter of health. The trajectory of the growth is more important than single units of measurement. Serial measurement of height and weight plotted on a growth chart provides a better basis of understanding your child’s health more than the height or weight taken in isolation. 2015-08-22 13:01:45
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My 4 year old son just doesn't want to eat any vegetable or non veg doesn't drink milk no fruits at....

My 4 year old son just doesn't want to eat any vegetable or non veg doesn't drink milk no fruits at all only dal rice that's it

11
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Parents are after all their children’s role models, children replicate what they see. Buy fruits every day and eat it in front of them. Offer them a piece of fruit when you are eating and if they accept it praise them. When you take them for shopping, encourage them to participate in buying their favourite fruits and vegetables. Replace snack jars and fridge desserts with fruits instead of chocolates, pastries and sweets. 2015-08-22 13:02:44
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
• Sit together as a family and eat at meal time. Make sure all of you eat vegetables in front of him. • Make the meal experience complete by allowing your child sit on the kitchen slab while you are cooking. Give him small pieces of salads (cut pieces of cucumber, carrot) and eat along with him. Let him help you with small tasks in the kitchen while cooking. Also, take him to the supermarket and let him choose his favourite vegetables. At home, cook dishes out of his vegetable selections and let him create happy experiences about vegetables. • Make some gestures like “yummy” when you eat vegetables. It creates interest. Don’t offer in the first instinct when he asks, let him ask again. • Decorate cut salads in an interesting fashion (like humpty dumpty, fish, moon etc.), he will love to pick and eat. If he likes dips, use it to make him eat his vegetables. Let him first try the concept of eating one vegetable and realize that it’s not such a bad experience. Subsequently encourage other vegetables. • Unlike a cut piece of vegetable, it is good to grate vegetables so that even some clever children cannot pick out the vegetables. • Always think of clever ways of adding vegetables into his favourite dish. Whether it is adding vegetables to his favorite food – like grating carrots in curd rice or stuffing vegetables into his paranthas; or choosing a vegetable topping instead of a chees topping while ordering for pizzas. 2015-08-22 13:02:58
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Milk is important to some degree as a source of calcium for bone growth. He should not consume more than 400 ml in a day. Toned milk is preferable. But if your son does not like milk at all then try other calcium rich sources like dairy foods like cheese, paneer, egg, curd. If he refuses any dairy products then calcium and Vitamin D supplements could be considered post consultation with your paediatrician. I would also advice exposing him to sun at least 30 minutes, 2-3 times a week as it a important source of vitamin D ( either during sports , PE etc) 2015-08-22 13:06:45
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My daughter is 7yrs old she don't eat properly everytime shes frustated and crying

My daughter is 7yrs old she don't eat properly everytime shes frustated and crying

12
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Like every other action, eating too is a learning experience. Your child needs to learn to pay attention to body signals when she is hungry, and understand her body’s way of telling her when she has had enough. Children need that confidence that food will be available when hungry and they should not be force fed when not hungry. Let them decide how much to eat. These are valuable lessons you will teach your child for their lifetime! • DO NOT FORCE FEED. By doing so, you can turn a simple dislike to a particular food to permanent hatred. They may later refuse other food as they link eating to be an unpleasant experience. The more you try to overpower them, the more miserably you will fail. • Try to make meal time a pleasant experience. Try to sit together as a family during meal time. It will encourage your child to eat and also let her pick from your plate. Avoid distractions like television or music. • Offer small portions of food to your child in a bite-sized colourful bowl or plate (eg. Mickey Mouse/ Donald Duck/ Barbie girl). This will ensure that she is not scared to see large quantities which will automatically reduce her appetite. Once she completes her portion, don't jump and serve but wait and let her ask for food. Give her a gentle praises for good choices. By doing this, you are encouraging to develop eagerness to food. • The child does not grow at the same pace at all times. The child growth chart is a very good indicator of their health rather than just the number of on the weighing machine by itself. • If the child refuses to eat what she used to eat before, don't fight or argue, just offer something different. Bring a variety of healthy choices into the diet. • If your child is fooling around at play time, perhaps she is not hungry. A child that’s hungry will not play. So doesn't pressurize her to eat. Leave her alone. If they ask for something, give them another chance, but if she is still fooling around then don’t offer until the next meal. • Some children like to eat one thing all the time, don't worry, let your child get used to habit of eating and create good memories from the eating experience. Then you could slowly introduce another food at a different time. • Try not to offer sugary things like chocolates, juices with added sugar, especially before the meal time as it takes away the appetite. • Regularize times for meals and snacks. For example three meals and two snacks in between. Don't nag your child to eat at meal time. Set some time limits (usually 30 minutes is enough) for yourself, if she is refusing to eat or eats small quantities, then take away her plate or bowl without any complaints or showing any disappointment. Don’t try to make her eat an hour later. Offer next only at snack time. She will certainly make up for the extra calories. This whole exercise should be carried out with the right sprit and with an intention to help your child. It should not come across to your child as a threatening behaviour, eg. slamming the plate if he does not eat, raising voice, and showing disappointment. By doing this you will simply make them lose their appetite. • It is reasonable to set some discipline around meal time and not to allow your child to make unpleasant comments about food. It is important that parents take control of meal time rather than allowing your child to take control. Both parents and family members need to be in agreement so that there are no wrong or confusing messages sent to child when it comes to feeding eg. A mother follows a particular schedule and father does something different. • It is reasonable to consider your child’s preferences for the kind of food prepared at home. But it is a bad idea to only prioritize her preferences. • If you don't like some food, don't make a comment about it in front of your child eg. “I can't stand spinach”, and then don't expect your child not to follow that behaviour! • Don't bribe your child to take a few mouthfuls, eg. Telling stories or showing something to persuade him to eat, it will not work well in long term. It will simply dampen their appetite in the long run. • Don't force your child to eat more immediately after recovering from an illness until his appetite has returned. • Don't feel pressurized or guilty about thinking what others have to feel about your child's eating habits. Every family has someone with eating problems. Don't compare someone else’s eating habits with your child. • Encourage your child slowly to eat on his own (start moving away from his vicinity using an excuse for few minutes at a time to see what they do with food). Start off slowly to encourage them to finish one meal on their own and then gradually build up. If they learn to eat one meal on their own there should be no reason why they cannot eat other meals. • Accept your child’s food choices for a while. If they like only one food and refuses to touch another they may need multivitamin supplements during that period. You can then gradually introduce a balanced diet. • If your child is throwing food around, you need to tell them firmly and calmly that food is for eating and not throwing. Give them some something like a ball or a toy to throw in the meanwhile. • Children have an amazing capacity to learn. If you want your child to learn good table manners, then you should have one. After all, you are their role models and they copy you. • If they have eaten half of the meal, and left the rest, don't pick up the plate and feed the other half. You are going to undo his ability to listen to his body. Just take the plate away and next time serve smaller amounts. When his hunger improves he will polish off the plate. • If your child is gagging with solids it is important that you teach them to eat on their own. This helps them to get over the suspicion of food. After a period you can slowly increase the consistency of their food. • With practice you should be able to stop thinking too much about your child’s food habits. • When the child feels no pressure, they will pay attention to their own appetite. • Feeling frustrated or angry will only stop you from doing the right thing for your child. • When you understand and introduce these small changes, your child’s behaviour will undergo a change as they have observed you change. Although be warned, the behaviour is prone to get worse before it gets better. • Its hard work, and takes a lot of patience and perseverance but at the end of the day it works. We all love our children and want them to learn and have the best. • If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor. This expert assessment can help you evaluate if your child has underlying medical problems. 2015-08-22 13:07:22
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My son is 15 month old having 8 kgs weight....He has'nt started walking till yet....He crawls and st....

My son is 15 month old having 8 kgs weight....He has'nt started walking till yet....He crawls and stands taking support What should do to increase his weight and make him walk on his own without support???? Please answer......

13
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Normal age for walking is up to 18 months, if you are using walker stop using it. Ask your paediatrician to plot growth on the growth chart; you will get a fair idea about his progress. Offer new food once every few days. It’s good to introduce any new food when the baby is more receptive and not cranky, eg. When the baby has woken up from sleep and not tired, he is due for a feed and not very hungry. It could be difficult to introduce new food when the baby is hungry and baby may not show interest in new food. You can also try giving some milk, calm the baby and then offer solids. Allow plenty of time for eating, especially at first. Rushing or forcing your baby could lead to problems. Go at your baby’s pace and stop when your baby shows you he has had enough. Allow your child when he is able to sit steadily, to play with food. He should get used to texture of different food, eg. Dough, water, consistency of lumpy food. It will develop curiosity in child with food. Don’t worry if he gets messy, use bibs, cover the floor with newspaper or a protective mat to make clearing up easier. Food play can get messy, but don't be too quick with the washcloth. Let your baby enjoy this important hands-on learning experience. Foods that are just about bite-size, which your baby can pick up and eat by himself, could qualify as finger food. Not only is eating finger food fun for your baby, it's an important step toward independence, which also helps him develop his fine motor skills and coordination. Good finger food to begin with is bread toast, biscuits that are soft and less risk of choking etc. As a guide, the best finger foods are foods that can be cut up into pieces that are big enough for your baby to hold in their fist, and stick out of the top of it. Pieces about the size of your own finger work well. The food should be easy to handle but not present a choking hazard. Vegetables should be cooked so they are soft enough to mash easily, and everything should be cut into tiny pieces. Resist the temptation to give your baby sweets like cookies and cake or high-fat snacks like cheese puffs and chips. Your baby needs nutrient-rich foods now, not empty calories. 2015-08-22 13:09:06
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My daughter is 14 years old, she hardly like to eat any vegetables except few like cauliflower, peas....

My daughter is 14 years old, she hardly like to eat any vegetables except few like cauliflower, peas, lady finger that too sometimes. As a parent it's very challenging how to overcome. At the same time I would like to know how important is milk for growing children.. Pls guide

14
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Parents are after all their children’s role models, children replicate what they see. Buy fruits every day and eat it in front of them. Offer them a piece of fruit when you are eating and if they accept it praise them. When you take them for shopping, encourage them to participate in buying their favourite fruits and vegetables. Replace snack jars and fridge desserts with fruits instead of chocolates, pastries and sweets. 2015-08-22 13:09:59
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Some children are fixated to few vegetables. Children at pubertal age should consume green leafy vegetables, drumsticks which are a source of iron. 2015-08-22 13:10:13
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Milk is important to some degree as a source of calcium for bone growth. He should not consume more than 400 ml in a day. Toned milk is preferable. But if your son does not like milk at all then try other calcium rich sources like dairy foods like cheese, paneer, egg, curd. If he refuses any dairy products then calcium and Vitamin D supplements could be considered post consultation with your paediatrician. I would also advice exposing him to sun at least 30 minutes, 2-3 times a week as it a important source of vitamin D ( either during sports , PE etc) 2015-08-22 13:10:45
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my daughter is 2.5 years old and she is underweight (9.6 kg only). within a few time after having a....

my daughter is 2.5 years old and she is underweight (9.6 kg only). within a few time after having a meal she pass stool. After consulting drs he suggested some reports, we did it and it detects rbc in it. we tried medicines as directed by him but had no luck till now. Would u pls advice on this?

15
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Ask your doctor to plot height and weight on the growth chart to understand how she is progressing. Passing stools immediately after eating is normal for a child at this age. We need to understand in what context RBC was detected in the stools and other tests if required. She will need a good assessment either by a paediatrician or a paediatric gastroenterologist. 2015-08-22 13:11:33
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My 2.4 year old doesn't seem to have interest in eating any fruit. I always have to divert her mind....

My 2.4 year old doesn't seem to have interest in eating any fruit. I always have to divert her mind or show her, her favourite videos to make her eat. Sometimes This becomes very stressful for both of us. What should I do to make her eat with her own interest?

16
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Avoid distractions during meal time, your child does not understand the concept of eating or fruit or vegetables, because she is engrossed in watching video. Let her concentrate on eating at meal time. It will take time, if you keep trying you will succeed. 2015-08-22 13:12:07
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Parents are after all their children’s role models, children replicate what they see. Buy fruits every day and eat it in front of them. Offer them a piece of fruit when you are eating and if they accept it praise them. When you take them for shopping, encourage them to participate in buying their favourite fruits and vegetables. Replace snack jars and fridge desserts with fruits instead of chocolates, pastries and sweets. 2015-08-22 13:12:25
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My Child is 25 months old. He is a fussy eater. He only eats plain paratha (salted) or roti (few bit....

My Child is 25 months old. He is a fussy eater. He only eats plain paratha (salted) or roti (few bites), some fruits, sweets. He is heavily dependent on milk. He DOESN'T TAKE vegetables in any form; NOTHING for breakfast like bread, pizza, noodles, dalia, pancake, muffins. This results in making him feel hungry at night, and then keep asking for milk after ~every 2 hours, and doesn't sleep till 12:00 at night, sometimes 1-2 am because he feels hungry. Some rare days, he eats dal (arhar and moong) by putting rhymes in front of him, and those days he sleeps whole night. My question is: How to get him interested in what we eat (We tried eating with him, offering our food several several times, but he doesn't even taste); and how should I develop healthy eating habits for him and a love for food now and in future.

17
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Cut down milk to not more than 400 ml/ day. He is filling his stomach from only milk and it is not giving him any optimum nutrition. Reduce salted parantha. Give stuffed parantha with vegetables and dips or methi parantha. Try innovative ideas to put vegetables into diet. Encourage fruits. Think of healthy diet apart from pizza, puff and bread. 2015-08-22 13:13:16
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
• It is natural that what your child likes to eat today may not be what they prefer next week, just adding misery to parental worries. • It is also natural for toddlers to have food fads - he may prefer to eat pastry with every meal, just to be replaced by chocolate or gulab jamun next week. • With time, children learn that only at mealtime they get their parent’s undivided attention or alternatively this si the only time they can display their rebellious attitude. • A child learns early that eating, or not eating, can be a great way to please or displease parents. It’s a habit that forms early and is difficult to change later. So think and act early. • If you say “NO” to a child, or prescribe an order – vegetables first and dessert later, they are very likely to the exact opposite of what you say. So always remember to reinforce good choices with praise. It is important to encourage or reward a child to create good eating habits. For example - When they eat their vegetables give them praise. When they sit still on a chair at meal time, appreciate them by saying “good girl/boy you are already sitting and ready for your meal!” Like every other action, eating too is a learning experience. Your child needs to learn to pay attention to body signals when she is hungry, and understand her body’s way of telling her when she has had enough. Children need that confidence that food will be available when hungry and they should not be force fed when not hungry. Let them decide how much to eat. These are valuable lessons you will teach your child for their lifetime! • DO NOT FORCE FEED. By doing so, you can turn a simple dislike to a particular food to permanent hatred. They may later refuse other food as they link eating to be an unpleasant experience. The more you try to overpower them, the more miserably you will fail. • Try to make meal time a pleasant experience. Try to sit together as a family during meal time. It will encourage your child to eat and also let her pick from your plate. Avoid distractions like television or music. • Offer small portions of food to your child in a bite-sized colourful bowl or plate (eg. Mickey Mouse/ Donald Duck/ Barbie girl). This will ensure that she is not scared to see large quantities which will automatically reduce her appetite. Once she completes her portion, don't jump and serve but wait and let her ask for food. Give her a gentle praises for good choices. By doing this, you are encouraging to develop eagerness to food. • The child does not grow at the same pace at all times. The child growth chart is a very good indicator of their health rather than just the number of on the weighing machine by itself. • If the child refuses to eat what she used to eat before, don't fight or argue, just offer something different. Bring a variety of healthy choices into the diet. • If your child is fooling around at play time, perhaps she is not hungry. A child that’s hungry will not play. So doesn't pressurize her to eat. Leave her alone. If they ask for something, give them another chance, but if she is still fooling around then don’t offer until the next meal. • Some children like to eat one thing all the time, don't worry, let your child get used to habit of eating and create good memories from the eating experience. Then you could slowly introduce another food at a different time. • Try not to offer sugary things like chocolates, juices with added sugar, especially before the meal time as it takes away the appetite. • Regularize times for meals and snacks. For example three meals and two snacks in between. Don't nag your child to eat at meal time. Set some time limits (usually 30 minutes is enough) for yourself, if she is refusing to eat or eats small quantities, then take away her plate or bowl without any complaints or showing any disappointment. Don’t try to make her eat an hour later. Offer next only at snack time. She will certainly make up for the extra calories. This whole exercise should be carried out with the right sprit and with an intention to help your child. It should not come across to your child as a threatening behaviour, eg. slamming the plate if he does not eat, raising voice, and showing disappointment. By doing this you will simply make them lose their appetite. • It is reasonable to set some discipline around meal time and not to allow your child to make unpleasant comments about food. It is important that parents take control of meal time rather than allowing your child to take control. Both parents and family members need to be in agreement so that there are no wrong or confusing messages sent to child when it comes to feeding eg. A mother follows a particular schedule and father does something different. • It is reasonable to consider your child’s preferences for the kind of food prepared at home. But it is a bad idea to only prioritize her preferences. • If you don't like some food, don't make a comment about it in front of your child eg. “I can't stand spinach”, and then don't expect your child not to follow that behaviour! • Don't bribe your child to take a few mouthfuls, eg. Telling stories or showing something to persuade him to eat, it will not work well in long term. It will simply dampen their appetite in the long run. • Don't force your child to eat more immediately after recovering from an illness until his appetite has returned. • Don't feel pressurized or guilty about thinking what others have to feel about your child's eating habits. Every family has someone with eating problems. Don't compare someone else’s eating habits with your child. • Encourage your child slowly to eat on his own (start moving away from his vicinity using an excuse for few minutes at a time to see what they do with food). Start off slowly to encourage them to finish one meal on their own and then gradually build up. If they learn to eat one meal on their own there should be no reason why they cannot eat other meals. • Accept your child’s food choices for a while. If they like only one food and refuses to touch another they may need multivitamin supplements during that period. You can then gradually introduce a balanced diet. • If your child is throwing food around, you need to tell them firmly and calmly that food is for eating and not throwing. Give them some something like a ball or a toy to throw in the meanwhile. • Children have an amazing capacity to learn. If you want your child to learn good table manners, then you should have one. After all, you are their role models and they copy you. • If they have eaten half of the meal, and left the rest, don't pick up the plate and feed the other half. You are going to undo his ability to listen to his body. Just take the plate away and next time serve smaller amounts. When his hunger improves he will polish off the plate. • If your child is gagging with solids it is important that you teach them to eat on their own. This helps them to get over the suspicion of food. After a period you can slowly increase the consistency of their food. • With practice you should be able to stop thinking too much about your child’s food habits. • When the child feels no pressure, they will pay attention to their own appetite. • Feeling frustrated or angry will only stop you from doing the right thing for your child. • When you understand and introduce these small changes, your child’s behaviour will undergo a change as they have observed you change. Although be warned, the behaviour is prone to get worse before it gets better. • Its hard work, and takes a lot of patience and perseverance but at the end of the day it works. We all love our children and want them to learn and have the best. • If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor. This expert assessment can help you evaluate if your child has underlying medical problems. 2015-08-22 13:13:39
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My daughter is 15 months old..she likes to have only milk,banana n pomegranate..no other fruits and....

My daughter is 15 months old..she likes to have only milk,banana n pomegranate..no other fruits and veggies..feeding main course is a big challenge..how to improve her feeding habits

18
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Don’t give fruit juice. Fruit should always be given as raw as it has fibre in it. Of course some children take a liking to one particular fruit or vegetable, which will eventually change. But it should not stop you from trying different vegetables and fruits. 2015-08-22 13:14:08
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Parents are after all their children’s role models, children replicate what they see. Buy fruits every day and eat it in front of them. Offer them a piece of fruit when you are eating and if they accept it praise them. When you take them for shopping, encourage them to participate in buying their favourite fruits and vegetables. Replace snack jars and fridge desserts with fruits instead of chocolates, pastries and sweets. 2015-08-22 13:14:19
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
• Sit together as a family and eat at meal time. Make sure all of you eat vegetables in front of him. • Make the meal experience complete by allowing your child sit on the kitchen slab while you are cooking. Give him small pieces of salads (cut pieces of cucumber, carrot) and eat along with him. Let him help you with small tasks in the kitchen while cooking. Also, take him to the supermarket and let him choose his favourite vegetables. At home, cook dishes out of his vegetable selections and let him create happy experiences about vegetables. • Make some gestures like “yummy” when you eat vegetables. It creates interest. Don’t offer in the first instinct when he asks, let him ask again. • Decorate cut salads in an interesting fashion (like humpty dumpty, fish, moon etc.), he will love to pick and eat. If he likes dips, use it to make him eat his vegetables. Let him first try the concept of eating one vegetable and realize that it’s not such a bad experience. Subsequently encourage other vegetables. • Unlike a cut piece of vegetable, it is good to grate vegetables so that even some clever children cannot pick out the vegetables. • Always think of clever ways of adding vegetables into his favourite dish. Whether it is adding vegetables to his favorite food – like grating carrots in curd rice or stuffing vegetables into his paranthas; or choosing a vegetable topping instead of a chees topping while ordering for pizzas. 2015-08-22 13:14:28
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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Fussy feeding, fooling around meal time is a very common problem in children. Parents must not try to force feed but rather wait for the child’s appetite to resurface. You could consider the following tips. • It is natural that what your child likes to eat today may not be what they prefer next week, just adding misery to parental worries. • It is also natural for toddlers to have food fads - he may prefer to eat pastry with every meal, just to be replaced by chocolate or gulab jamun next week. • With time, children learn that only at mealtime they get their parent’s undivided attention or alternatively this si the only time they can display their rebellious attitude. • A child learns early that eating, or not eating, can be a great way to please or displease parents. It’s a habit that forms early and is difficult to change later. So think and act early. • If you say “NO” to a child, or prescribe an order – vegetables first and dessert later, they are very likely to the exact opposite of what you say. So always remember to reinforce good choices with praise. It is important to encourage or reward a child to create good eating habits. For example - When they eat their vegetables give them praise. When they sit still on a chair at meal time, appreciate them by saying “good girl/boy you are already sitting and ready for your meal!” Like every other action, eating too is a learning experience. Your child needs to learn to pay attention to body signals when she is hungry, and understand her body’s way of telling her when she has had enough. Children need that confidence that food will be available when hungry and they should not be force fed when not hungry. Let them decide how much to eat. These are valuable lessons you will teach your child for their lifetime! • DO NOT FORCE FEED. By doing so, you can turn a simple dislike to a particular food to permanent hatred. They may later refuse other food as they link eating to be an unpleasant experience. The more you try to overpower them, the more miserably you will fail. • Try to make meal time a pleasant experience. Try to sit together as a family during meal time. It will encourage your child to eat and also let her pick from your plate. Avoid distractions like television or music. • Offer small portions of food to your child in a bite-sized colourful bowl or plate (eg. Mickey Mouse/ Donald Duck/ Barbie girl). This will ensure that she is not scared to see large quantities which will automatically reduce her appetite. Once she completes her portion, don't jump and serve but wait and let her ask for food. Give her a gentle praises for good choices. By doing this, you are encouraging to develop eagerness to food. • The child does not grow at the same pace at all times. The child growth chart is a very good indicator of their health rather than just the number of on the weighing machine by itself. • If the child refuses to eat what she used to eat before, don't fight or argue, just offer something different. Bring a variety of healthy choices into the diet. • If your child is fooling around at play time, perhaps she is not hungry. A child that’s hungry will not play. So doesn't pressurize her to eat. Leave her alone. If they ask for something, give them another chance, but if she is still fooling around then don’t offer until the next meal. • Some children like to eat one thing all the time, don't worry, let your child get used to habit of eating and create good memories from the eating experience. Then you could slowly introduce another food at a different time. • Try not to offer sugary things like chocolates, juices with added sugar, especially before the meal time as it takes away the appetite. • Regularize times for meals and snacks. For example three meals and two snacks in between. Don't nag your child to eat at meal time. Set some time limits (usually 30 minutes is enough) for yourself, if she is refusing to eat or eats small quantities, then take away her plate or bowl without any complaints or showing any disappointment. Don’t try to make her eat an hour later. Offer next only at snack time. She will certainly make up for the extra calories. This whole exercise should be carried out with the right sprit and with an intention to help your child. It should not come across to your child as a threatening behaviour, eg. slamming the plate if he does not eat, raising voice, and showing disappointment. By doing this you will simply make them lose their appetite. • It is reasonable to set some discipline around meal time and not to allow your child to make unpleasant comments about food. It is important that parents take control of meal time rather than allowing your child to take control. Both parents and family members need to be in agreement so that there are no wrong or confusing messages sent to child when it comes to feeding eg. A mother follows a particular schedule and father does something different. • It is reasonable to consider your child’s preferences for the kind of food prepared at home. But it is a bad idea to only prioritize her preferences. • If you don't like some food, don't make a comment about it in front of your child eg. “I can't stand spinach”, and then don't expect your child not to follow that behaviour! • Don't bribe your child to take a few mouthfuls, eg. Telling stories or showing something to persuade him to eat, it will not work well in long term. It will simply dampen their appetite in the long run. • Don't force your child to eat more immediately after recovering from an illness until his appetite has returned. • Don't feel pressurized or guilty about thinking what others have to feel about your child's eating habits. Every family has someone with eating problems. Don't compare someone else’s eating habits with your child. • Encourage your child slowly to eat on his own (start moving away from his vicinity using an excuse for few minutes at a time to see what they do with food). Start off slowly to encourage them to finish one meal on their own and then gradually build up. If they learn to eat one meal on their own there should be no reason why they cannot eat other meals. • Accept your child’s food choices for a while. If they like only one food and refuses to touch another they may need multivitamin supplements during that period. You can then gradually introduce a balanced diet. • If your child is throwing food around, you need to tell them firmly and calmly that food is for eating and not throwing. Give them some something like a ball or a toy to throw in the meanwhile. • Children have an amazing capacity to learn. If you want your child to learn good table manners, then you should have one. After all, you are their role models and they copy you. • If they have eaten half of the meal, and left the rest, don't pick up the plate and feed the other half. You are going to undo his ability to listen to his body. Just take the plate away and next time serve smaller amounts. When his hunger improves he will polish off the plate. • If your child is gagging with solids it is important that you teach them to eat on their own. This helps them to get over the suspicion of food. After a period you can slowly increase the consistency of their food. • With practice you should be able to stop thinking too much about your child’s food habits. • When the child feels no pressure, they will pay attention to their own appetite. • Feeling frustrated or angry will only stop you from doing the right thing for your child. • When you understand and introduce these small changes, your child’s behaviour will undergo a change as they have observed you change. Although be warned, the behaviour is prone to get worse before it gets better. • Its hard work, and takes a lot of patience and perseverance but at the end of the day it works. We all love our children and want them to learn and have the best. • If your child has been failing to gain weight, falling on the growth chart, it is advisable to contact a specialist doctor. This expert assessment can help you evaluate if your child has underlying medical problems. 2015-08-22 13:14:41
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Hi, My Son id 3 years old. for initial 11 month i breastfeed him then he use to have milk from milk....

Hi, My Son id 3 years old. for initial 11 month i breastfeed him then he use to have milk from milk bottle and he was easily having 2-3 bottles per day. but earlier in this year i wean him from bottle to cup.. but since then he has been fussy while having milk.. it's been 6 months but he hardly have 1 cup of milk per day and sometimes even vomit while drinking milk. kindly suggest me how can i make milk/milk time interesting for him.

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
Children in this age should not drink milk by bottle as it is going to damage their teeth. Milk requirement in this age is around 400 ml/ day. Milk is a source of calcium, if he is not taking this amount of milk, give him other dairy products like cheese, paneer, curd, egg, which will take care of his calcium requirements. You need not worry about his milk intake then. But keep trying to give milk by cup which he eventually will accept. Don’t force feed children. It will lead to vomiting and food aversion eventually and it will be challenging to manage. 2015-08-22 13:15:08
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My son is 2.11 yrs. He likes and wants to have only milk in feeder. He would not have anything else....

My son is 2.11 yrs. He likes and wants to have only milk in feeder. He would not have anything else no matter what u do...done with showing laptop birds dogs sun moon etc even left him to eat mess on his own but no luck. The biggest constraint is that he would not like to taste anything new. I am sure he would like but he wouldn't. If I refuse him milk then he can stay without it whole day but he will be very cranky. I have a year old baby also. Now seeing him even she would refuse food. Feeding time is a pain for me. Moreover I am worried about his weight. Not up to the mark. In school he would not have lunch as he doesn't eat anything except milk. I gave him pasta once with all veggies cut very small still he didn't have. I am very tensed as he has started to miss school these days because of it. It becomes difficult for teachers also to deal with him as he would not eat and due to hunger he would be cranky and would not listen to them.pls help how should I make him eat.

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Dr. Dinesh Banur
What child eats over 1 week is more important than what he eats over one day. You should work strategies for him to understand the concept of hunger and food. Set meal time and place, each meal time should be 30 minutes, and if he doesn’t eat by 30 minutes, take the plate out. In between he is allowed to have only water, even if he cries of hunger. (It doesn’t mean that you are starving your child, but you are setting a meal discipline) so that his hunger resurfaces. Once he understands that meal is only available at specific time, he will finish the plate. Don’t head to his pressures and break this schedule. All family members involved in care including grand parents should maintain consistency. Avoid fruit juice/ sweets/ sugary drinks before meal time or as a bribe for not having food. Sit together as a family and eat. It will take some time, for you to teach this discipline, once you have taught, things will fall in place. Don’t give milk more than 400 ml per day. Use cups. Use semi skimmed milk. It will take some time but he will start drinking by cup. Try innovative way of giving vegetables and fruits as explained in question 1 and 2. 2015-08-22 13:15:39
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Hi sir,My daughter is 1.5 yr and her weight is 9.9 kg & height 75 cm.She is vry fussy eater.She do n....

Hi sir,My daughter is 1.5 yr and her weight is 9.9 kg & height 75 cm.She is vry fussy eater.She do not like any thing except breast feed.Everytime when i need to give meal ,i need to go out like park...if some outside person say "eat" then at times she eat comfortably.I tried everything for her like giving different food,milk in different combination,but i m nt successful.

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My Son who is 3.5 years old would like to drink juices like Orange & Banana shake but he hates to ea....

My Son who is 3.5 years old would like to drink juices like Orange & Banana shake but he hates to eat whole fruits as such Apple, Orange or Grapes. Any tips or suggestions to make him eat whole fruits instead just juices?

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My daughter is 2.5 takes very long to eat..chews a lot...is it good...no green vegetable yet...Wat....

My daughter is 2.5 takes very long to eat..chews a lot...is it good...no green vegetable yet...Wat to do...is it good to give aptivate or aptimust..are there side effects..?

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My son is 3 year old. He is very choosy while eating. Veggies and milk he just hate. All just he eat....

My son is 3 year old. He is very choosy while eating. Veggies and milk he just hate. All just he eat is eggs ,chicken sometimes,plane whole wheat chapati n corn. And his likes are not stable. After few days again refuses he is vey lean n just weigh 11.5 kg. plz help.

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My daughter is 7 years old. She does not eat vegetables. She also doesnt want to eat proper meals, l....

My daughter is 7 years old. She does not eat vegetables. She also doesnt want to eat proper meals, like rice, roti, dal, has to be forced fed, which she eats very less and with very little interest. What to do to make her eat properly?

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How important is milk for a toddler? My son dislikes milk and has it only once around 8 ounce. Is it....

How important is milk for a toddler? My son dislikes milk and has it only once around 8 ounce. Is it enough

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My daughter is 2.5 years old. She still does not chew her food. Hence I end up overcooking or mashin....

My daughter is 2.5 years old. She still does not chew her food. Hence I end up overcooking or mashing the food for her. Since she doesn't chew she chokes up vomits or spits out the food. I have tried introducing all kinds of finger foods but all in vain.Kindly advice

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