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Created by Surabhi Roy
Updated on Aug 21, 2016

How to treat children with Autism Autism is a developmental disorder that makes it hard to communicate or interact with other people. Some kids have autism that is mild; others have autism that is severe. Children with autism can have trouble understanding subtle directions and requests. They may become overwhelmed by busy and noisy environments. And, sometimes, they do not enjoy being touched. Because every kid is different, ask the child's parents what to expect and what kinds of things the child enjoys doing. Here are some things to know: Follow the child's routine, especially at bedtime or mealtime. Kids with autism prefer structure and can get upset if routines are different from what they're used to. Ask the parents about the child's favorite toys so you can play with them. Go slowly. One tactic is to sit alongside the child and mimic his play. That might attract his attention and lead him to join you. Special toys can help you encourage the child to cooperate. For example, you might say, "If you brush your teeth, you can play with your toy car. " Don't be offended if the child decides to play alone or limits interactions with you. This is part of the disorder. Maintain a calm environment. For example, skip a trip to the playground when you know a neighborhood gathering is likely there. Avoid bringing your friends or other people the child may not know into the home. Go slowly when it comes to physical contact. Find out from the parents how their child reacts to affection. A quick hug or light tickle could set off a child with autism. Know how to deal with difficulties: Ask the parents how to handle it if the child becomes upset or agitated. In general, as long as the child isn't hurting himself or anyone else, it's best to roll with the tantrum. Keep the child safe and close to you. If the child starts to settle down, you might bring out a favorite toy and start playing with it to create a distraction. Some children with autism might calm down when cuddling a special stuffed animal. Others might respond well to sitting in a rocking chair with you or swinging on the backyard swing set. Hope this would help.

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| Aug 22, 2016

Hi Surabhi, thanks for sharing this information.

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