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How To Introduce Library Culture To Your Child?

Nandini Muralidharan
7 to 11 years

Created by Nandini Muralidharan
Updated on May 15, 2018

How To Introduce Library Culture To Your Child

I still remember my first library card. It was pink, had my name printed in black and was handed to me by my school librarian with a “Be careful, if you lose it, you don’t get to borrow books!” warning. There’s been no looking back since. I attribute my love for reading to that same librarian, and I can say that reading has enriched my life in so many ways. Introducing your child to the local library will open a new world to her. And the best part about a library – browse for hours on end, there’s no pressure to buy books, there’s always a chance you’ll find something you like. Read on to find out more about introducing your child to library culture.

How To Introduce Your Child To Library Culture

Yes, it’s easy to just walk to the closest bookstore and pick out some well-written books for your child. But there’s always a budget, right? And think of the hundreds or even thousands of books that your child will be exposed to if he visits a library. Another important aspect is how a library can help immensely with school work and academics. Here are some pointers on how you can get him started:

  1. Do your research:

    Children’s books are difficult to write, and some authors do a wonderful job of it. So finding the age-appropriate books for your child is important, as is finding a library that has these titles.
    • Read up about the various different types of children’s books available and figure out what will be appropriate for your child. There are several online forums and social media groups that serve this very purpose.
    • Visit a few libraries in your city to see what they have to offer. Some libraries specialize in children’s books. If you find one of these, get your child a membership without further ado!
  2. Talk to your child about borrowing books:

    Teach your child the difference between borrowing a book from a library and buying one at the bookstore. Yes, it is equally important to treat both books well, but he needs to learn that a borrowed book needs to be returned on time for others to enjoy.
  3. Find out your child’s likes:

    Some children enjoy books about fantasy, while others enjoy reading about cars and vehicles. Some want to escape into Hogwarts, while some prefer the cool trees of Dehra that Ruskin Bond writes about. So, talk to your child about what he enjoys reading, to pique his interest.
  4. Share your own library experience:

    Tell your child interesting anecdotes from your own library visits as a child. Talk to him about how you’d wait eagerly for a specific book to be returned by someone else before you could check it out. From this, your child will also learn the importance of patience without instant gratification.
  5. Help with school work:

    Many projects and assignments in school require your child to read beyond what is part of his syllabus. A library is an excellent place for research and extra reading. Accompany your child to the library and help him choose books on the subject. Spend time with him in the library as he reads.
  6. Make it a weekly activity:

    Schedule a day of the week when you and your child visit the library together. And allow him to borrow as many books as he wants (and is allowed by the library!) at once. There’s no such thing as too many books!
  7. Find libraries with other activities:

    Many libraries have book-related or other activities on some days of the week. Story hours, quiz sessions, puzzle corners, and volunteering are some activities that might interest your child.
  8. Don’t make reading a chore:

    Yes, it is important to read to gain information and knowledge. It is important to read books on various subjects taught at school. But also, introduce your child to the idea of reading for pleasure. Let him discover the joy of reading a book for a good story. When reading becomes a scheduled activity, it can become joyless.

So don’t wait. Find out where the nearest library is and pay a visit. You might just have a voracious reader on your hands!

Did you find this blog on introducing library culture to your child, useful? Are you and your child members of a library? Share your thoughts with us in the comments section!

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| May 16, 2018

My daughter is 8yrs old. Her hubby is to read storybooks....

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| May 15, 2018

amazing suggestions.

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| Feb 10, 2018

mam. mera beta 10 years ka hai 5 class me hai but vo study me apna interest nhi dekha. jb ki vo study me acha hai... pls koi solutions btai..

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| Feb 09, 2018

Introducing our child to library culture by accompanying the child and the idea of reading for pleasure are key takeaways of this blog . thanks for sharing!

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